With the Radeon HD 6950 and 6970 uncovered and out in the open it became apparent that the Radeon HD 6950 is bit of a weird product to position. Basically its in its own class and segment.

Tagged with a price tag of roughly 269 EUR however this card could be a fantastic sweet spot for those that would like to pursue the CrossfireX way . See with two Cayman PRO GPUs on board you effectively can double up everything without being extremely CPU limited. Each Radeon HD 6950 graphics card has 1408 Shader Processors on-board, so for less than 550 EUR you could get a graphics solution with 2816 shader processors and two times 2 GB graphics memory partitions.

The theory is daunting and the concept interesting. Today's article will not only show you the CrossfireX performance of these two cards, but also will roughly reveal what AMDs to be released product under codename "Antilles" will bring to the market in terms of performance. Antilles will replace the Radeon HD 5970, a dual-GPU solutions merged into one graphics card.

And we have to tell you, where we are a little puzzled about the Radeon HD 6950 all by itself, but in CrossfireX this solutions seems to kick ass massively.

Joining us today in this article is a R6950 board from Gigabyte, this is a reference board with a Gigabyte sticker really. Since we do not continuously want to report about reference performance we decided to get the Gigabyte board as leading card in this review. So on the next page we'll chat a little about multi-GPU setups, we'll walk through the Gigabyte bundle and then head on over to check out variables like power consumptions, heat, noise and of course all game tests ... the results will not disappoint, no Sir.

R6950 Twin Frozr II OC review

 Radeon HD 6950. A series (6900) that has been received with somewhat mixed feelings. Everybody expected the overall performance to be a notch higher. Then again armed and tagged with the right price these boards can kick ass for sure and certainly you can play all your games in high monitor resolutions with exemplary quality settings.

MSI is addressing the product as well with several models. One of the ... well, quirks is bit a big word, but the slight negative of the R6950 was its huge size and the huge cooler. As such MSI went back to the drawing board and redesigned the PCB, armed it with quality components and decided that they would need to slap a nice cooler on there. As such we see the model as tested today, running slightly above reference specification yet with the latest twin Frozr II cooler mounted on top of it.

The end result is a nice performing product that remains quite silent yet keeps cooling performance well under control as the load temperature of the R6950 now drops back to roughly 60 Degrees C, and that is interesting especially when you are tweaking and overclocking. As this article will show you, we'll bring the card quite close to a full GHz clock frequency, and that my friends means added value on what seems to be a very interesting product.

Radeon HD 6950 1GB vs GeForce GTX 560 Ti review

When the GeForce GTX 560 Ti was released shortly ago, one things was clear - the price versus performance ratio would be great. Especially with the extensive factory overclocked models in mind, these cards perform really well.

Initially the 560 Ti was targeted solely against the Radeon HD 6870, but the one thing that became clear real fast was that the slightly more powerful Radeon HD 6950 was not far away from the GTX 560 Ti at all performance wise. So a couple of weeks ago AMD decided to sort of 'ambush' NVIDIA, by releasing a 1 GB version of the Radeon HD 6950, a product with the very same features and specifications as it's big brother, the 2 GB version was priced way below what we all expected it to be.

The strategy here is, and pardon my French here, AMD wanted to cock-block NVIDIA both performance and value wise. Therefore it is with little surprise to find out that AMD is inserting the 1 GB Radeon HD 6950 SKU for only 229 EUR.

And in US dollars AMD’s partners are introducing the AMD Radeon HD 6950 1GB variant, bringing all the capabilities of the AMD Radeon HD 6900 Series to new price points. Between $200-$300 end users can choose from:

  • Radeon HD 6870 1GB: drops from $239 to $219
  • Radeon HD 6950 1GB: introduced for $259
  • Radeon HD 6950 2GB: drops from $299 to $269

But bare in mind, new SKUs of the AMD Radeon HD 6950 1GB will be available beginning mid-February, but as you can understand it is yet another interesting development from AMD as the sheer horsepower you can purchase these days under the 300 USD bracket ... is truly amazing.

In this review we are not going in depth on architecture, you can read that in our reference reviews. This is more a quick comparison in-between the two cards. Please understand that the R6950 1GB is identical to the 2GB version specs wise, except that memory partition of course.

First off, we'll dive into a photo-shoot showing both cards, and comparing them a little. We'll address power consumption, heat and noise levels and then put both cards to the test.

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Posted by ralfowen

Aaah, it's Monday morning, 9AM - with a cup of coffee in my right hand staring at the monitor, looking outside through the office window where there is a clear blue sky and the sun is shining. Sitting 3 meters away from me is "Diablo" our primary mean graphics benchmarking machine, sitting in it, is this red little devil armed by two GPUs and a lot of features. Heck yeah, last week the Radeon HD 6990 arrived here in the office, and is sitting like two buns in an oven waiting to be consumed. It's gonna be a good day.

Radeon HD 6990 ladies and gentlemen is AMD's latest ATI Radeon HD dual-GPU based graphics card. And for now it will be the fastest 'single' graphics card available on the planet. The performance numbers you will see are anything short from astonishing, breathtaking stuff for a wicked product.

For many weeks now the Radeon HD 6990 has been a product of much discussion. Nobody really could confirm what GPUs would be used, how much graphics memory it would get and so on. Well, rest assured. AMD stuck two Cayman XT GPUs (R6970) onto the PCB and allows them to be clock at R6970 speeds as well, in fact you'll get options in clock-frequencies and TDP with the help of a small micro-switch seated on the card, which leads to 2 vBIOS, one with more acceptable TDPs and the other enabling a higher clock frequency mode. Now I've stated it, Cayman XT GPUs, that means the full shader processor count inside that GPU is available, that sums up towards 3072 shader processors (!)

Memory wise, AMD decided not to skimp here either, the Radeon HD 6990 is a card that will be perfectly suited for Eyefinity solutions, say 3 to 5 monitors PER Radeon HD 6990. In such setup it's wise to have a little more memory per GPU, especially with stuff like high anti-aliasing levels in mind. As such the Radeon HD 6990 comes with a flabbergasting 4 GB of graphics memory, that's two GB per GPU.

All in all, we'll have a lot to talk about today, we'll have a quick chat about verbs like Barts, Cayman and Antilles, then we'll describe the architecture a bit better, we'll have a close look at the products with the help of a photo-gallery ... and well that's all followed by power consumptions, heat levels and performance measurements of course.

Radeon HD 6990 Crossfire review

It's time for the second review based on that beast of a graphics card called Radeon HD 6990. In this round we'll be looking at an actual retail sample flown in with the speed of light by HIS technology.

The card itself is 100% reference with a HIS sticker on it, as such many segments of this review will be similar to the reference review. With one distinct difference, since we have two cards... we can also look into CrossfireX performance, that's right... four GPUs dominating your games. Will it be worth it?

Radeon HD 6990 ladies and gentlemen is AMD's latest ATI Radeon HD dual-GPU based graphics card. And for now it will be the fastest "single" graphics card available on the planet. The performance numbers you will see are anything short from astonishing, breathtaking stuff for a wicked product.

For many weeks now the Radeon HD 6990 has been a product of much discussion. Nobody really could confirm what GPUs would be used, how much graphics memory it would get and so on. Well, rest assured. AMD stuck two Cayman XT GPUs (R6970) onto the PCB and allows them to be clock at R6970 speeds as well, in fact you'll get options in clock-frequencies and TDP with the help of a small micro-switch seated on the card, which leads to 2 vBIOS, one with more acceptable TDPs and the other enabling a higher clock frequency mode. Now I've stated it, Cayman XT GPUs, that means the full shader processor count inside that GPU is available, that sums up towards 3072 shader processors!

Memory wise, AMD decided not to skimp here either, the Radeon HD 6990 is a card that will be perfectly suited for Eyefinity solutions, say 3 to 5 monitors PER Radeon HD 6990. In such setup it's wise to have a little more memory per GPU, especially with stuff like high anti-aliasing levels in mind. As such the Radeon HD 6990 comes with a flabbergasting 4 GB of graphics memory, that's two GB per GPU.

All in all, we'll have a lot to talk about today, we'll have a quick chat about verbs like Barts, Cayman and Antilles, then we'll describe the architecture a bit better, we'll have a close look at the products with the help of a photo-gallery... and well that's all followed by power consumptions, heat levels and performance measurements of course.

Anyway, let's talk about architecture and then focus on the HIS Radeon HD 6990 graphics card.


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Posted by ralfowen

Last Wednesday when the Radeon HD 5970 launched, the product was extremely well received by the hardware enthusiast community. And for valid reasons as it is an incredible piece of hardware. As we stated in our article -- the product is clocked a little conservative though. AMD needs (wants) this graphics card to run under a peak wattage of 300 Watt. Clocking the product any higher they would have broken that limit, likely set by PCI-SIG which decided upon a 300W GPU limit for graphics cards.

ATI literally enforced a hardware limitation by implementing a 6-pin and 8-pin power header on the card. Meaning, 75W is delivered through the PCIe bus - 75W on the 6-pin header and 150W on the 8-pin header. That's in total 300W available for the graphics card.

Now with a TDP of already 294W you'd think that there is no overclocking (6W) headroom left. Well, if you have a proper power supply with some more Amps on the 12 rails or have a PSU like PC Power and Cooling offers (ditch all available AMPs on one big fricking 12V line) then you can imagine that we can easily pass that 300W limitation and take the R5970 to sat ... 400W.

So let's try that out. Now for a successful (massive) overclock you'll be needing a little extra voltage on the GPU though. So today we are going to overclock the Radeon HD 5970 and break away from that 300W limitation. This is why we ALWAYS say, get yourself proper equipment .. and in the case of a PSU, some reserves.

Our end result ? We boosted the Radeon HD 5970 Core from 725 MHz towards 935 MHz and the 4000 MHz memory is running and purring steady at 5240 MHz completely stable ---  and that's a baffling result on just the reference air-cooler.

Wanna learn how we do it ? Well read the next couple of pages, and sure benchmark results based on our overclock experience are included as well.

Radeon HD 5970 Single card and Crossfire review

Behold the ATI Radeon HD 5970

All rise -- the Hemlock is here ! ATI's best kept secret ever *coughs* will be released today. Hey everybody and welcome to a nice feature length review on the latest dual-GPU offering from ATI. The gossip and well a carefully injected marketing strategy made sure everybody heard about the dual-GPU solution from ATI many moons before the initial release. It got you guys excited, curious and that most certainly did build a lot of momentum and hype surrounding this product release.

You know what, I would not have called the product Hemlock -- but bulldog ! It's time to unleash the beast. Today its released and obviously we'll have a look at this beast of graphics. It's pure adrenaline, pure muscle power and to date the fastest graphics card on the globe. And though clocked a little conservative .. this puppy can be tweaked into the stratosphere. Which we'll show you as well.

The highest of high-end gaming pleasure was labeled under the codename Hemlock, and when we seek up that phrase we'll learn that Hemlock is short for 'a poisonous plant, Conium maculatum, of the parsley family, having purple-spotted stems, finely divided leaves, and umbels of small white flowers, used medicinally as a powerful sedative'. Gods honest truth here. The codename matched the product really well -- but we like bulldog better ;)

So we are fortunate enough to have two Radeon HD 5970 samples in our LAB, the first a reference sample from ATI, the second a full retail sample from the folks at HIS. It's their Radeon HD 5970 Limited Edition. We'll put both to the test and since we have two -- we'll manage a little CrossfireX session with four GPUs as well.

Enough said in this introduction, have a peek at the latest and greatest DX11 class product on the globe, and then let's head onwards to the next page where we'll startup a lengthy review to go along with the sheer size of this card.


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Posted by ralfowen

Can I take you guys back one year in time ? August 15th 2007. I posted a review on the Radeon HD 2600 XT back then. That product sold for roughly 140 USD. It was a mid-range product under codename RV630 with 120 Shader cores clocked at roughly 800 MHz. Again, that's one year ago ... that was considered mid-range. Six months later we saw a a die-shrink with the Radeon series 3600 which we can categorize at the same level.

Now go back to present time, today we look at the Radeon HD 4550. It's among the cheapest desktop graphics product that ATI can deliver at your doorsteps. This Radeon HD 4550 (GPU codename RV710XT) comes with an optional 256 MB GDDR2 or optional 512MB GDDR3 and will cost you .. 45 to 55 USD respectively.

And that's a manufacturer suggested retail price. So you can drop the most expensive model to 39 to 49 USD in e-tail for sure.  Now why the weird little flashback introduction ? This dirt cheap graphics card still packs 80 Shader cores to compute, post-process and render games. And yes, it comes with the same 256MB/512MB DDR3 64-bit memory. So definitely, it's slower, but massively cheaper yet carries all the new features those products had.

Make no mistake, of course this is not a gaming card at all, by far ! Yet this is a GPU harboring pretty a decent clock speed allowing HDCP protected Blu-Ray decoding and optimization over the UVD2 video decoder engine, dual monitor output and yes at 1024x768 or 1280x1024, and sure perhaps you can still play some games as well.

At 45-55 USD, I think that's worthy some of our time to check it out.





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Posted by ralfowen

It's not exactly a secret that for companies like ATI and NVIDIA it is hard to keep the rumor mill under control. It was early January this year already that certain details surfaced on this lovely wise web hinting about the fact that ATI was working on 40nm products. Weeks later another rumor surfaced, some 40nm products should be arriving in the April/May timeframe and among the new products would be a chipset that carries product codename (ASIC name) RV740, slated as the first 40nm release. And that's interesting all by itself.

Now .. the technology industry works in mysterious ways and a pre-production model, slash prototype RV740 board to Guru3D.com arrived at our office a couple of days ago.

Not being tied to an NDA, without further ado, lets meet and greet with that RV740 graphics chipset. RV740 is positioned somewhere in the upper segment of budget level products. We are sure this product is going to be cheaper than 99 USD / 89 EUR. And considering where the product is targeted in the market, ATI is pulling a rabbit out the hat with a head the size of an elephant.

Why? What can you expect? Well, from what we see... performance is really close to the performance level of a Radeon HD 4850. So meanwhile others are re-labeling and reinserting their products at a new price point, ATI is moving forward with more interesting steps. Smaller die-size, more shader processors (compared to RV730), oh and that life-size rabbit I just mentioned... it's GDDR5 memory.

We are going to bring you guys a nice little sneak preview of what ATI is working on. Let me clearly state, nothing in this review is finalized or can be seen as a concluding fact, the specifications (clock frequencies) and configurations might change for all we know. We are testing an early engineering sample here. It will however be a pretty good assessment of what ATI is going to release somewhere in April.

You guys ready? Let's meet the RV740, and though we don't know it's real name just yet, allow us to call this product the Radeon HD 4750 for the ease of understanding, product placement


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Posted by ralfowen
Product: R4890 Cyclone SOC 1024MB
Manufacturer: MSI
Information: website
Street price: 180 USD

So if we look back, say roughly a year .. what were the two products that had the most impact and success? Yeah, I tend to think that was the release of Core i7 and the Radeon 4870 based on the RV770 graphics processor. Last year when ATI introduced their Radeon HD 4870 series product it was clear from day one and onwards that they designed an ASIC which was very powerful, and thanks to gDDR5 memory, a big performance leap at an affordable price was a reality.

Prolonging the success of the 4870... in early April this year ATI launched a respin ASIC called the Radeon HD 4890. As you guys likely know this is labeled as the RV790 ASIC, a slightly tweaked yet faster running version of that original model.

One of the biggest surprises of that RV790 graphics processor was its scalability in terms of clock frequency. Where the Radeon HD 4870 reference was clocked at 750 MHz, the Radeon HD 4890 was from day one clocked at 850 MHz. But it didn't stop there though, no Sir. Merely a week or two after the launch of the 4890 the first rumors, and later on press-releases, surfaced; the AIB, AIC partners of ATI would be releasing overclocked models of the Radeon HD 4890, which was just barely released. 900 MHz is the norm for most of the overclocked products. The really exquisite ones are clocked at 950 MHz and right now there are even cards being released with a 1000 MHz core clock frequency (!).

As such it is the first time ever that we are testing a graphics card with it's graphics core clocked at 1 GHz, and this editor actually finds that to be a milestone in the history of Guru3D.com

So when we look all the way back to that Radeon HD 4870 and compare it to the new faster clocked 4890 models, we surely have to admit, ATI and its partners have done a hell of a job moving forward at a steady and incremental pace. Today we will test and review the all new MSI Radeon HD 4890 Cyclone SOC edition (Super OverClocked), and oh-my-gosh ... for the money this thing is going to be fairly spectacular.

Have a peek at the product and then let's move onward to a nice in-depth review of the MSI Radeon HD 4890 Cyclone SOC


Overclocking the Radeon HD 4890

This week the Radeon HD 4890 was released by ATI and as our reference article showed, it has a lot of overclocking potential. I mean seriously, it has a lot of headroom there which could results in 10% better performance on average.

Typically overclocking can be managed really well through the Catalyst control center, however .. the control center always has certain restriction as in 'how much' you can actually overclock. In this article we'll show you how you can overclock the easy way, with the help of this little application we make ourselves, Rivatuner.

This article is really simple as all we'll show you is, how to manage an overclock; and of course throw in a couple of additional benchmarks.

Overclocking & Tweaking
As most of you with most videocards know, you can apply a simple series of tricks to boost the overall performance a little. You can do this at two levels, namely tweaking by enabling registry or BIOS hacks, or very simple, tamper with Image Quality. And then there is overclocking, which will give you the best possible results by far.

What do we need?
One of the best tool for overclocking NVIDIA and ATI videocards is our own Rivatuner that you can download from our website. If you own an ATI or NVIDIA graphics card then the manufacturer actually has very nice built in options for you that can be found in the display driver properties.

Where should we go?
Overclocking: By increasing the frequency of the videocard's memory and GPU, we can make the videocard increase its calculation clock cycles per second. It sounds hard, but it really can be done in less than a few minutes. I always tend to recommend to novice users and beginners not to increase the frequency any higher then 5% (in total) of the core and memory clock MHz.

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Posted by ralfowen

Early in February we had the opportunity to show you a sneak preview of the now final product that we are testing today. The Radeon HD series 4700. Slated for a launch in late April, that article opened up a lot of eyes.

See, ATI lately is aggressive in it's product line-up, constantly adding and shifting their products, forcing their products and competition to become faster, yet cheaper. And that's just great news for us as consumers isn't it?

Today, we have another bang for buck product, a product that I like very much. As what ATI is doing today is pretty remarkable. They are releasing the Radeon HD 4770, a mainstream product at a budget price. Trust me when I say that after reading this review, you will be impressed. And here's the three step plan that ATI applied to the Radeon HD 4770:

Step one, ATI shifted the GPU fabrication to a 40nm node. The result is a product that is smaller and uses less current. With that fact in mind, you can often increase clock frequency. Then compensate heat with a dual-slot cooler, and take it up yet another notch.

Step two was to use an ASIC design based off the RV770 (Radeon HD 4850 / 4870), as such this product comes with a full 640 shader processor setup.

Three, arm the graphics card with high frequency gDDR5 memory. And while the bus width is 128-bit, they used gDDR5 and doubled up that missing bandwidth again.

Then end result, features and performance wise, is a product that roughly equals the Radeon HD 4850. And at a MSRP of 99 USD that surely does not suck. And mind you that is specifically the starting MSRP here, as we can certainly expect this product to fall towards ~80 USD / 75 EUR in e-tail in the weeks to come.

So without further ado, let's review the final product this time, the Radeon HD 4770... mainstream performance, at a budget price


Overclocking the Radeon HD 4770

This week the Radeon HD 4770 was released by ATI and as our reference article showed, it has a lot of overclocking potential.

Being a budget card with a lot of punch, overall performance is to be found in the mid-range segment. We here at Guru3D.com would like to teach you how to get more out of your 99 USD investment. In fact we'll show you how to get another 10 to 20% additional performance out of the card, totally free.

I mean seriously, the Radeon HD 4770  has a lot of tweaking headroom.

Typically overclocking can be managed really well through the Catalyst control center, however .. the control center always has certain restriction as in 'how much' you can actually overclock. In this article we'll show you how you can overclock the easy way, with the help of this little application we make ourselves, Rivatuner.

This article is really simple as all we'll show you is, how to manage an overclock; and of course throw in a couple of additional benchmarks.

So what exactly is  Overclocking & Tweaking ? -- Well, as most of you with most videocards know, you can apply a simple series of tricks to boost the overall performance a little. You can do this at two levels, namely tweaking by enabling registry or BIOS hacks, or very simple, tamper with Image Quality, which you never want to do really. Then there is overclocking, which will give you the best possible results by far, on the fly, for free. it only takes a little time an patience.

Literally by increasing the frequency of the videocard's memory and graphics processor, we can make the videocard increase its calculation clock cycles per second, making it run faster. It sounds hard, but it really can be done in less than a few minutes. A word of advise though, I always tend to recommend to novice users and beginners not to increase the frequency any higher then 5% (in total) of the core and memory clock MHz.

What do we need? One of the best tool for overclocking NVIDIA and ATI videocards is our own Rivatuner that you can download from our website. If you own an ATI or NVIDIA graphics card then the manufacturer actually has very nice built in options for you that can be found in the display driver properties.



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Posted by ralfowen


So you just finished reading the Radeon HD 5450 review did ya ?now  Well wait there is more ... just when you thought you can pull out, ATI pulls you back in. Yes my friends ATI is not yet done releasing graphics card in the very popular Radeon 5000 series. Oh no Sir, in fact this month alone will see no less than three graphics card releases in total.

It's simple -- ATI isn't done yet filling up the series product line as they want to offer a graphics card for any budget. This month two more cards are being released as next to today's launch of the 5570 we expect a Radeon HD 5830 quite soon  as well, which I guarantee you will be a very popular card in performance and price.  But here's what ATI offers starting today:

  • Radeon HD 5450
  • Radeon HD 5570
  • Radeon HD 5650
  • Radeon HD 5670
  • Radeon HD 5750
  • Radeon HD 5770
  • Radeon HD 5850
  • Radeon HD 5870
  • Radeon HD 5970

With that information imprinted in your brain let's talk about the Radeon HD 5570.  ATI today is launching the most budget of gaming graphics cards, the Radeon series 5500. In specific today we'll look at the Radeon HD 5570. A DX11 class product, with multi-monitor Eyefinity support (up-to three monitors) and a very low price -- set at just 69 USD.

For the money versus quality, it will actually make a bitching nice HTPC card, but here's the real advantage, with 400 unified shaders processors you certainly can handle some low-level gaming with it as well. Half a TeraFLOP is what is thrown at you performance wise with a card that not uses roughly 40W of current.

At the very least that's interesting, let's check it out and then head on over to the next page please.

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Posted by ralfowen

Here at Guru3D we have a sharp eye on the latest and greatest from the hardware industry, often the focus is on high-end components. Every now and then though we receive a product that is to be found in the budget segment, the sub 100 EUR/USD area. These products often offer a lot of value for money, and always... seriously you'll always be able to tweak the living daylights out of them.

Today as such we wanted to re-examine the Radeon HD 5670, a sub 100 USD graphics card that certainly is not a card with a lot of muscle, but for low-level and not too demanding gaming, it can suffice. MSI decided to redesign the board a little bit, slapped a Cyclone cooler on the GPU, ditched their high-end 'military class' components on it, equipped it with some faster memory and bam... you've got yourself a product that can be tweaked into the stratosphere.

I'm not joking here, this card comes at a default clock of 775 MHz, yet we were able to push it fairly easy over 1 GHz, and that certainly does help out with a somewhat limited product.

Too good to be true, or real value? Well, let's find out in a review on the MSI R5670 Cyclone 1G, oh yeah... they slapped 1 GB of graphics memory on there. Have a peek and then let's head onward into the review.



When ATI released the Radeon HD 5670 last week they put a product on the market that allows for a little game play, a product that drives several monitors, a product that is excellent for generic desktop usage including usage with high-resolution monitors but also .. it created a nearly perfect HTPC graphics cards if you look at video decoding, acceleration and post processing versus performance and price.

The one thing we mentioned in the reference review however was the fact that the reference product is a tiny bit too audible for a HTPC (well at least for me .. I'm totally anal like that). So I was already expecting ATI's partners to release a product with custom cooling to keep them noise levels down a notch further.

Of course the minute when that popped into my mind I already received an email from the guys at HIS, asking us to review the Radeon HD 5670 equipped with their classic ICEQ cooler. And that equals completely silent noise levels versus good cooling at a fair price.

HIS product always have been grand in terms of price, performance and features. A company's products I'd purchase anytime over say a brand like Sapphire for many good reasons


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Posted by ralfowen

MSI R5830 Twin Frozr II graphics card tested

One of the companies that has received increased media coverage here at Guru3D is MSI, for many good reasons. Next to their regular products they have a development team in the VGA division consistently brewing on new ideas, implementations trying to push to the outer limits of quality. Over the past, say 18 months, things have changed a lot for MSI as their products where lifted from mostly reference design based products to a series of graphics cards with customized PCBs, special coolers, the world's best overclocking software allowing not just core and memory frequency overclocks, but also voltage adjustments. They stepped it up a notch alright.

So next to the regular products, you have read up on Lightning editions, HAWK editions, pretty much gear catered for the more enthusiast end-user. End yep .. you guessed it right, that would be the Guru3D.com audience.

Today's product is based on the new Radeon HD 5830. MSI again made sure that their version needed to be interesting, so they designed a custom PCB, used durable quality components and then added their latest Twin FRoZr II cooler. The end result is a product that looks just awesome, performs at baseline level, but overclocks just really well.

The Radeon HD 5830 is positioned in-between the Radeon HD 5770 and Radeon 5850. A product that would cost roughly 250 USD and performance wise would sit in-between the aforementioned graphics cards. So here's what ATI did, they took the sweet Radeon HD 5850, disabled three shader clusters and fooled around with the clocks a little.

Have a peek at what we test today and then head on over to the next page, where we'll look at the MSI R 5870 Twin FroZR II edition graphics card.

Radeon HD 5830 review

For us as editors it's sometimes baffling to see how quickly things can change in the hardware industry. ATI crawled back on top roughly a year ago already with the famous Radeon HD series 4000. By the time Windows 7 was released last year in October, ATI already had the first DX11 class product ready BEFORE the Windows 7 launch. And sure, while the volume availability was lacking, at least they had a product out there. In the time in-between then and now, slowly and steadily ATI has been traveling that yellow brick road and was able to fortify the DX11 class graphics card segment with a product in every foreseeable segment. Today ATI will finish the lineup with the last product of the 5000 series before we see respin products.

Again, read this well, EVERY possible segment in the market after today has been addressed by ATI, whereas NVIDIA still needs to release their first card. And to me that is just baffling...

So where then was there still a gap in the market for ATI? Well, in-between the Radeon HD 5770 and Radeon 5850 there is room for another product. A product that would cost roughly 250 USD and performance wise would sit in-between the aforementioned graphics cards. So here's what ATI did, they took the sweet Radeon HD 5850, disabled three shader clusters, fooled around with the clocks a little and that's what is being released today as the Radeon HD 5830.

The Radeon HD 5830 will in many ways be an extremely attractive product when it comes to performance and features. A product that many of you have waited on, and even many more will wait a little longer on, as this is a card that is going to be very popular once it dips towards 200 USD. Let's go check it out and meet, look at, try and test out the all new Radeon HD 5830.


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Posted by ralfowen


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